Graduate Students

Sohad Murrar

sohad2

Sohad’s CV
Sohad’s website
Email Sohad at smurrar@wisc.edu

Sohad Murrar is a sixth year Ph.D. student of Social Psychology interested in group and inter-group processes involving prejudice and identity formation, cross-cultural group dynamics,  social interventions and Entertainment Education. She received her B.A. from Northwestern University in Psychology and Asian & Middle East Studies in 2010 and her M.A. in the Social Sciences specializing in Comparative Human Development from the University of Chicago in 2011.

Contact Information:
Department of Psychology
University of Wisconsin – Madison
1202 West Johnson St.
Madison, WI 53706-1611
Office 438C


Sarah Gavac

Sarah’s CV
Sarah’s Website
Email Sarah at  gavac@wisc.edu

Sarah Gavac is a fifth year PhD student of Social Psychology. Sarah has two main lines of work: one on normative tightness and one on morality. Normative tightness is the degree social norms are pervasive, clearly defined, and reliably imposed. Sarah is looking at how threat and identification with a threatened group are linked to normative tightness. Sarah’s work on morality aims to understand the link between attitudinal and behavioral responses to behaviors that violate moral norms. More on Sarah’s research.

Sarah has been the TA for Introduction to Psychology, Child Development, Research Methods, and Human Sexuality a total of 11 times. Sarah has been the instructor for Human Sexuality twice: face-to-face and, after a year of development, in an online format. More on Sarah’s teaching.

Sarah has a B.A. in Psychology and a B.S. in Biochemistry from Case Western Reserve University.

Contact Information:
Department of Psychology
University of Wisconsin – Madison
1202 West Johnson St.
Madison, WI 53706-1611
Office 438C


Mitchell Campbell

Email Mitch at mcampbell9@wisc.edu

Mitchell Campbell is a third year PhD student of Social Psychology. He received his B.A. in Psychology from Carleton College in 2014.

Mitchell’s work focuses on concealed or partially concealed identities (e.g., class, sexual orientation, mental illness) and examines how concealability affects prejudice, discrimination, and intervention strategies. He’s also interested in personal narrative as a method of prejudice reduction. The underlying assumption of his work is that a well-implemented behavioral approach is the most productive route to reducing prejudice, by reducing negative intergroup behaviors, promoting positive intergroup behaviors, and encouraging behaviors known to also lead to attitude change, such as intergroup contact.

Contact Information:
Department of Psychology
University of Wisconsin – Madison
1202 West Johnson St.
Madison, WI 53706-1611
Office 438B